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Thread: Physics, Quanta, String Theory and more

  1. #121
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    Default High-powered mathematicians take on free will

    dear friends,

    http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/a...=announcements

    their more advanced paper is here;

    http://arxiv.org/ps_cache/quant-ph/p.../0604079v1.pdf

    be well, be love.

    david

    high-powered mathematicians take on free will
    mondays, march 23 through april 27, 2009, 8 p.m. · a02 mcdonnell hall

    conway, a major figure, to give lectures on ideas formed with kochen

    ten years ago, princeton mathematician john conway wowed standing-room-only crowds with a series of public math lectures. among many things, he spoke about ancient greek geometers and his modern discovery of surreal numbers. he threw in some math tricks, too. audiences flocked to hear the joys of math recounted by one of its masters and left enthralled by conway's intellectual wizardry.

    on monday, march 23, conway -- who has fought his way back to health from a 2006 stroke -- will launch another lecture series that will once again place his mind and legendary personality squarely in the spotlight.

    this intellectual journey promises to be different.

    this time, the presentations will have one focus. working with his longtime colleague, princeton mathematician simon kochen, conway is set on explaining to the university community and the public over six weeks the tenets of their "free will theorem."

    the gist of it is this: they say they have proved that if humans have free will, then elementary particles -- like atoms and electrons -- possess free will as well.

  2. #122
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    Default Can fractals make sense of the quantum world?

    dear friends,

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/...html?full=true

    be well, be love.

    david

    can fractals make sense of the quantum world?
    30 march 2009 by mark buchanan

    quantum theory just seems too weird to believe. particles can be in more than one place at a time. they don't exist until you measure them. spookier still, they can even stay in touch when they are separated by great distances.

    einstein thought this was all a bit much, believing it to be evidence of major problems with the theory, as many critics still suspect today. quantum enthusiasts point to the theory's extraordinary success in explaining the behaviour of atoms, electrons and other quantum systems. they insist we have to accept the theory as it is, however strange it may seem.

    but what if there were a way to reconcile these two opposing views, by showing how quantum theory might emerge from a deeper level of non-weird physics?

    if you listen to physicist tim palmer, it begins to sound plausible. what has been missing, he argues, are some key ideas from an area of science that most quantum physicists have ignored: the science of fractals, those intricate patterns found in everything from fractured surfaces to oceanic flows (see what is a fractal?).

    take the mathematics of fractals into account, says palmer, and the long-standing puzzles of quantum theory may be much easier to understand. they might even dissolve away.

  3. #123
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    Default Light!

    this is not new science, in fact it's rather old, but the recent issue of astronomy magazine had an article by bob berman in it about light--its properties and behaviors. i can't link you to it because you have to subscribe to the magazine to get to it on the website, but i'll summarize:

    when einstein discovered the way light warps around stars, his genius was confirmed. now we use light exclusively for measuring the distance of stars and other celestial objects. some properties of light: it must always be moving ("if it stops, it ceases to exist"); it travels at an astounding speed, 186,282.4 miles per second; nothing slows it down, although when travelling through things like glass or water it will be absorbed and re-emitted which gives it the appearance of slowing down. essentially, "light has its own reality. it independently ignores everything else and zooms along special paths through space-time, called null geodesics. this magical realm - which includes curved space, mutating time, and distances that change depending on circumstance - is the weird portal the world entered 90 years ago [when einstein made his discovery]."

    after i finished the article i thought, hey, i'm that light, i'm made of light! i can do all of those things!

    awesome, isn't it?

  4. #124
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    Default

    discovery poses challenge to galaxy formation theories

    a team led by an indiana university astronomer has found a sample of massive galaxies with properties that suggest that they may have formed relatively recently. this would run counter to the widely-held belief that massive, luminous galaxies (like our own milky way galaxy) began their formation and evolution shortly after the big bang, some 13 billion years ago. further research into the nature of these objects could open new windows into the study of the origin and early evolution of galaxies.

  5. #125
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    Default Mass - is it there or not

    is it matter or energy. mass or traction.
    what makes it so hard to lift 10 liters of water.

    i'm a first time poster but long time reader.
    physics and both quantum and macro are my interests.

    this article is not that new of a topic but it was a an eye opener for me.
    that view makes sens going from the quantum state of energy to tangible matter to humans.
    it's all the same just more dense.
    but this view of energy to matter analogy i have not seen before.

    this excerpt below is the part that is very convincing to me.
    physics.” from their perspective, einstein’s famous formula (in which mass can be equated with via e = mc2) is not about the conversion of one fundamental thing, mass, into another fundamental thing, energy; but rather “a statement about how much energy is required to give the appearance of a certain amount of mass.” if they are correct in their theorizing, “there is no such thing as mass; only electric charge and energy, which together create the illusion of mass.”
    the whole text is at this link
    http://www.halexandria.org/dward167.htm

  6. #126
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    St-Hubert, Quebec.
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    Default Theory of Everything.

    hi again.

    here i am, back, with the "good" url limk to the theory:

    last time, the video was too complicated. . .
    this time, it has a beautiful ending ! !

    http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/g...verything.html

    blue skies.
    Enjoy the marvelous http://www.whatthebleep.com/
    which got me to "The Ra material" and this forum.

  7. #127
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    Default What string theory is really good for

    dear friends,

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/...-good-for.html

    be well, be love.

    david

    what string theory is really good for
    01 june 2009 by jessica griggs

    string theory: you love it or loathe it. to some it represents our best hope for a route to a "theory of everything"; others portray it as anything from a mathematically obtuse minefield to a quasi-religion that has precious little to do with science.

    there might be a middle way. string theory's mathematical tools were designed to unlock the most profound secrets of the cosmos, but they could have a far less esoteric purpose: to tease out the properties of some of the most complex yet useful types of material here on earth.

    both string theorists and condensed matter physicists - those studying the properties of complex matter phases such as solids and liquids - are enthused by the development. "i am flabbergasted," says jan zaanen, a condensed matter theorist from the university of leiden in the netherlands. "the theory is calculating precisely what we are seeing in experiments."

    if solid science does turn out to be the salvation of string theory, it would be the latest twist in a tangled history. string theory was formulated in the late 1960s to explain certain features of the strong nuclear force, one of four fundamental forces of nature. it holds that electrons, quarks and the like are not point-like particles but minuscule, curled-up, vibrating strings. no sooner had this idea emerged, though, than it lost ground to particle physicists' "standard model", which proved capable of describing not just the strong force but also the weak and electromagnetic forces - and did so far more intuitively through the interactions of point-like quantum particles.

  8. #128
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    Default

    http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/ne...e/04060904.asp

    natural quasicrystals discovered

    04 june 2009

    scientists have discovered a rare form of solid - a quasicrystal - in a rock sample from russia's koryak mountains. quasicrystals have unusual properties and have previously only been made in the laboratory. the discovery could redefine the field of mineralogy and expand our understanding of how quasicrystals form, leading to new applications...

  9. #129
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    physicists create 'black hole for sound'
    http://www.newscientist.com/article/...for-sound.html

    the team cooled 100,000 or so charged rubidium atoms to a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero and trapped them with a magnetic field. using a laser, the researchers then created a well of electric potential that attracted the atoms and caused them to zip across the well faster than the speed of sound in the material.

    this setup created a supersonic flow that lasted for some 8 milliseconds, fleetingly forming an acoustic black hole capable of trapping sound...

  10. #130
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    light changed to matter, then stopped and moved
    cambridge, mass., feb. 8, 2007 -- by converting light into matter and then back again, physicists have for the first time stopped a light pulse and then restarted it a small distance away. this "quantum mechanical magic trick" provides unprecedented control over light and could have applications in fiber-optic communication and quantum information processing.
    http://www.photonics.com/content/rea...rticleid=28520

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